Finchcocks in Kent has only been up and running as a venue for luxury piano courses for a year but has already established itself as something rather special. It was set up to provide world-class tuition in the enchanting setting of the 300 year old grade 1 listed Finchcocks manor house, after the closure of the world-famous piano museum that had occupied the building for the past half century.

Rather than providing the bare minimum of creature comforts, Finchcocks has really gone to town with sensitively restored bedrooms, each with a spacious en-suite bathroom, and breathtaking views of the surrounding Kentish countryside.

And then there is the food. Finchcocks has its own private chef, creating the most delicious meals from local produce, with homemade cakes and tea every afternoon.

It doesn’t stop with luxury rooms and grand pianos – fine dining is also part of the experience at Finchcocks

– The Spectator

But what really sets Finchcocks apart is its superb facilities. The piano courses are deliberately kept small, with a maximum of 8 participants per course. Everyone gets their own grand piano for the duration of the course and plenty of contact time with the tutor. The chance to play such a variety of beautifully-maintained grand pianos is, of its own accord, worth making the trip for: there’s a Bösendorfer, Blüthner, Bechstein and Steinweg as well as a concert-ready Yamaha.

I depart revitalised, with renewed enthusiasm for this enduring hobby

– The Sunday Times

The tutors are a blend of young and up-and-coming and well-established teachers. David Hall, described by the Sunday Times as “a musical powerhouse”, is a young and incredibly talented specialist in improvisation and harmony. Graham Fitch, who has made his name with his Practising the Piano blog and e-book and YouTube channel, is a regular tutor. And Warren Mailley-Smith, a concert pianist who earned himself a world record by memorising Chopin’s entire piano works for a series of concerts in London, runs composer-specific weekends on Chopin, Debussy and Rachmaninov.

Paradise for pianists

– BBC Music Magazine

Participants are welcome to bring non-playing partners, who can enjoy the surrounding countryside whilst the tuition takes place, and join in for the delicious food and the magical Saturday evening recital over a glass of wine. Private courses are also available for groups of 5 or more piano playing friends.

Courses are available for pianists of all levels. Lower intermediate courses are aimed at people playing repertoire that is between grades 3 and grade 5. Upper intermediate courses cater for those between grades 5 and 7, and advanced courses are for those who play at grade 8 level or above. Players who are keen to return to the piano after a gap of a decade or more are also very welcome.

Upcoming courses with good availability are:

31 May – 2 June: Lower intermediate weekend with David Hall

7 – 9 June: Advanced weekend course with Andrew Dunlop

14 – 16 June: Intermediate weekend course with Melanie Spanswick

29 July – 2 August: 5 day summer school for advanced players with Graham Fitch

To find out more, email jenny@finchcocks.com, call 01580 428080 or have a look at the Finchcocks website which has a full list of forthcoming piano courses.


 


This is a sponsored post. All information and images are supplied by Finchcocks.
Disclaimer: The Cross-Eyed Pianist does not necessarily endorse organisations that provide sponsored posts which link to external websites, and does not endorse products or services that such organisations may offer. In addition, The Cross-Eyed Pianist does not control or guarantee the currency, accuracy, relevance, or completeness of information found on linked, external websites. However, every effort is made to ensure such information contained on this site is accurate at the time of publication.

**Now booking for 2020**

The piano summer school is now an established part of the year for many amateur pianists, and the recent launch of several new courses and summer schools is a mark of their continued popularity. Much more than a “piano holiday”, the piano summer school is an opportunity to study with leading pianist-teachers, observe others being taught, hone skills such as technique and performance, enjoy concerts, and meet other pianists – this last factor being, for many, one of the chief attractions. Being a pianist can be a lonely activity, and while many of us enjoy the solitude, it can be helpful, supportive and inspiring to meet other pianists to discuss aspects such as practising, repertoire, and much more… Doing all of this in a beautiful location with luxury accommodation and fine food can only enhance the experience.

Concert pianist James Lisney has extensive experience teaching at piano summer schools and courses, including the long-standing Summer School for Pianists and the Hindhead Piano Course. His supportive and inspiring approach empowers adult pianists to “take charge of their music, to give it priority within their busy lives and have the confidence and skills to explore as artists“, and fosters confident, independent musicianship.

James’s expertise and enthusiasm gives everyone the confidence to perform at the daily masterclasses and evening concerts, but it is at the individual sessions, where the magic really happens.

Based at Le Vert, a charming country house hotel in the Cahors region of SW France, James Lisney’s summer piano courses (launched May 2019) continue this legacy, offering adult pianists tuition in the form of workshops and masterclasses, one-to-one lessons, and performance opportunities – all within a relaxed, entertaining and considerate environment. Participants can enjoy comfortable accommodation, gourmet food and a convivial atmosphere. In addition, James offers support via email and Skype throughout the year, and regular piano ‘meetups’ give participants valuable performance experience and opportunities to socialise and enhance connections and friendships made during the courses.

a nurturer and inspirer….. you’ll come away from his classes born again (musically) and raring to practise

– Conrad Williams, author of The Concert Pianist

Further information and prices

Meet the Artist interview with James Lisney

I recently attended Chetham’s International Summer School and Festival for Pianists (or “Chets” as it is affectionately known) for the first time as an observer and concert reviewer (read my articles here). It was a fascinating and exhausting (in a good way!) glimpse inside Europe’s largest piano summer school, and it was easy to see why people get hooked on the Chets experience – the special atmosphere, the teaching, the wealth of music to enjoy, and much more – and return year after year.

There are many piano courses on offer, from one-day events to long weekends in a quiet corner of Somerset (Jackdaws), longer courses like Chets and the Summer School for Pianists in Walsall, or upmarket piano holidays in France where expert tuition by a leading concert pianist is combined with gourmet food and luxury accommodation. Of course, most people’s motivation for attending a piano course is, primarily, to improve their playing and have it critiqued by a skilled teacher. Additionally, courses offer opportunities to build confidence in performing, observe others being taught, and meet other pianists – this last factor being, for many, one of the chief attractions. Being a pianist can be a lonely occupation, and while many of us actively enjoy the solitude, it can be helpful, supportive and inspiring to meet other pianists. Everyone I spoke to at Chets talked about the benefit of being amongst so many other pianists, all of whom understand and appreciate what makes us “tick”. At a piano course, no one is going to roll their eyes or yawn if you start enthusing about Beethoven’s last sonatas or the beauties and intricacies of Chopin’s Fourth Ballade (or indeed the First, Second and Third Ballades!), and this sense of a “piano community” and shared passion is incredibly important.

Philip Fowke teaching at Chets
Philip Fowke teaching at Chets

I have been on enough piano courses myself to know why I attend them and what I want to get out of them, and I thought it would be helpful for those considering a piano course, especially one of the scale of Chets, to have some additional tips from people who are regular attendees on how to get the best out of a piano course.

Before you go on the course…..

  • If you are attending a big, busy course like Chets or the Summer School for Pianists in Walsall, both of which last nearly a week and offer a full programme of activities alongside the teaching, get plenty of sleep in advance. This may sound strange, but these courses can be very tiring, as they require large amounts of physical and mental energy, emotional labour, drive, motivation and social/partying skills.
  • It can be daunting playing for other people and a different teacher, and obviously you will have to play in order to have your playing critiqued. If you are nervous about playing in a masterclass or workshop situation, consider inviting a few friends round for music and drinks and play some of your pieces to them. Paradoxically, the more distracting and self-conscious you feel when performing to your friends, the more you will learn, the less stressful and more enjoyable it will be on the course, and the more secure your performance will be in lessons or other performance situations.
  • Repertoire: Plan and prepare in advance the music you want to play at the course and bring enough music at different stages of preparation, but not music you have only just started learning (unless you want some specific advice on technique, for example, from a teacher). Bringing repertoire which is comparatively familiar avoids over-attention to basic musical understanding. Settled pieces, which are reasonably well known, allow you to work with a teacher on the more enriching aspects of the experience such as expression, gesture, personal interpretation, and performance, and make the best use of everyone’s time and money – including yours.

When you are on the course…..

  • Pace yourself. You will want to go to everything, but this can sap energy, so be selective. Choose activities outside of the teaching and workshops which you feel will be most beneficial/interesting to you. Try new things too – if you’ve never played duets or accompanied another instrumentalist, why not have a go?
  • Be open-minded and accepting of the advice given by the teachers. If you take lessons with a regular teacher, feedback and critique from a different teacher can be very helpful, offering new insights into the music, context, technical issues, performance etc. When I played the Schubert Sonata on which I had been working for over three years to a different teacher on a course at Jackdaws last autumn, he helped me find a new energy and focus in the music. Critique from other teachers – and comments from fellow students – can reframe your attitude to playing pieces you think you already know well.
  • That said, do whatever works best for you: there is no one ‘right way’ to get the most out of a piano course – take from the tuition and workshops what you feel will really benefit you in developing your playing.
  • Take advantage of all the opportunities of learning from the tutors and your fellow participants. Courses like Chets operate an “open-door” policy so that every lesson and workshop is open to all – go and observe others being taught, and attend workshops: there is much to be gained from hearing others play and watching a skilled teacher in action.
  • Watch other students and observe as many teaching styles as possible. Don’t talk during these sessions unless invited. When you are listening you are learning; when talking you are merely repeating what you already know, and it’s disrespectful to other students and teachers.
  • Don’t assume you can have unlimited time to practise once you arrive on the course. Competition is often high for practise facilities, and these are often limited. Most courses are for learning and observation rather than practising.  By all means, practise to some extent, but don’t miss out on concerts, lectures, lesson observation etc just because you have locked yourself in a practise room.  
  • Be generous with other musicians – both professional and amateur, with praise when appropriate and encouragement when they feel vulnerable. Remember other people feel nervous too and be supportive towards your fellow students.
  • Don’t compare yourself to other people. If it’s an all-ability course there are bound to be people playing advanced pieces. Remember they are not “better” than you, just “more advanced”. Be prepared to be surprised by the level and variety of pieces that other people bring. Draw inspiration from others’ performances and enjoy hearing a wide range of repertoire. Courses are often one of the best ways to discover new repertoire (and at Chets, Forsyths music shop can order in new music for you while you are there!).
  • Don’t worry about being judged: teachers on piano courses are generally very encouraging and their feedback is given in a positive way. Remember that these things are not competitive.
  • Do take every opportunity to play for/with other people, whether pieces you’re working on or reading through duets.
  • Don’t fret if something (be it a recital, workshop or lesson) doesn’t live up to expectations or hasn’t gone as well as you hoped. Piano courses are often so jam-packed that there is always something else around the corner to enjoy.
  • Be prepared to play something silly or light-hearted – it breaks down both social and language barriers and reminds us that music is not just a profound expression of humanity!
  • Don’t be shy about approaching other people. Remember everyone is there for the same reason – a shared love of the piano. Participants, faculty and staff always have interesting stories, backgrounds and thoughts on music, and socialising is a chance to enjoy stimulating conversations and forge new friendships and connections.
  • Don’t drink too much, or stay up too late. It can be fun to remain chatting in the bar after the final concert of the evening, but teaching sessions often start at 9 or 10 am in the morning and tiredness really does impact on your playing.
  • Above all, enjoy yourself!

Thanks to my piano friends Marie, Claire and Douglas (all enthusiastic Chets regulars) for contributing their advice to this article – and for their company during my weekend at Chets.

 

Courses for Pianists

 

(picture: Philip Fowke teaching at Chetham’s Summer School for Pianists)

Guest post by Emma Williams

Finchcocks is a handsome manor house in the Kent countryside, which has been filled with music since its inception in the 18th century.

Until recently, it was home to a living museum of music – which I had visited as part of a private visit. We’d had a marvellous time being let loose on the collection, which included some fine harpsichords and clavichords, square pianos (including one which belonged to Queen Victoria, made by John Broadwood & Sons), fortepianos, and grand pianos by Clementi, Pleyel, Erard and Broadwood. It’s no surprise therefore that I was sad to hear the news that Finchcocks was on the market and its exceptional keyboard museum was to be closed.

But there’s great news: the wonderful musical tradition, established by Richard and Katrina Burnett back in 1971, will be continued at Finchcocks! The new owners have announced they will be hosting regular residential piano courses at Finchcocks, and guests will be accommodated in the stunning, recently renovated 18th Century Coach House.

The first weekend piano course was held in November, run by Finchocks’ Musical Director Dave Hall, who did an excellent job engaging and inspiring a group of advanced intermediate pianists. Finchcocks’ courses will also cater for complete beginners (a welcome addition to the piano course world, as most courses are aimed at advanced players), and there’s a fabulous range of pianos to play on by Steinway, Bosendorfer, Yamaha and Broadwood. In the cellar, there are eight high-tech digital grand pianos.

My lovely piano teacher, Graham Fitch, will also be leading a few piano courses at Finchcocks next year. For more information about courses, tutors and accommodation, please visit www.finchcocks.com

Emma Williams is a keen piano player and recently attended a Finchcocks Weekend Piano Course.


Further reading

Why go on a piano course?

Courses for pianists in the UK and Europe