Who or what inspired you to pursue a career in music?

Mstislav Rostropovich

Who or what have been the most important influences on your musical life and career?

Rostropovich and, later, my husband Julian Lloyd Webber, who taught me a lot through his deep knowledge of music and repertoire.

What have been the greatest challenges of your career so far?

Practising!

Which performances/recordings are you most proud of?

Vivaldi Concertos for 2 Cellos with my husband and the European Union Chamber Orchestra (Naxos). Apart from the well known existing concerto for 2 cellos, we arranged five other Vivaldi concertos for two instruments. I think they all work very well on two cellos. We also included an arrangement of a Piazzolla Milonga which is a beautiful piece.

Which particular works do you think you perform best?

Possibly the Bach solo suites

How do you make your repertoire choices from season to season?

Depends on the venue/concert promoter and what we agree

Do you have a favourite concert venue to perform in and why?

The beautiful new Bradshaw Hall at Royal Birmingham Conservatoire – I played the Vivaldi Concerto for 2 cellos with Jian Wang, conducted by Julian.

What is your most memorable concert experience?

For all the wrong reasons it would have to be Julian’s final performance as a cellist in Malvern on May 2nd 2014. It was a brilliant concert but with a very sad atmosphere.

As a musician, what is your definition of success?

To please my audience

What do you consider to be the most important ideas and concepts to impart to aspiring musicians?

Enthusiasm, a questing nature and a constant love for the music.

What is your most treasured possession?

My Bergonzi cello


Jiaxin Lloyd Webber graduated from Shanghai Conservatory of Music in 1997. She was already giving performances with the Shanghai Symphony Orchestra but left China for further studies in New Zealand where she received her Master Degree at Auckland University in 2001.

While in New Zealand Jiaxin was principal cello of the Auckland Chamber Orchestra, a founder member of the Aroha String Quartet and played regularly with both the Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra and New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. With the Auckland Symphony Orchestra she performed cello concertos by Dvorak, Elgar and Lalo.

Now resident in the UK, Jiaxin is married to the world renowned cellist Julian Lloyd Webber and has performed with Julian for BBC Radio 3, Classic FM, CNN Global TV, and BBC TV. They have recorded for Universal Classics and Naxos. Their recordings have been chosen as Record of the Month by both Gramophone and BBC Music Magazine and as CD of the Week by both Classic FM and BBC Radio 3. Their 2013 recording, ‘A Tale of Two Cellos’ was the Number One UK classical album for many weeks and is one of the Naxos label’s bestselling recordings of all time. Julian and Jiaxin Lloyd Webber have played sell-out tours with such orchestra as the English Chamber Orchestra and the European Union Chamber Orchestra and have made many nationwide TV and Radio appearances on such high profile programmes as BBC Breakfast, The Andrew Marr Show and Radio 4 Midweek.

Julian Lloyd Webber, acclaimed cellist and Principal of the newly rebuilt Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, on inspiration, passion and the importance of music education

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Who or what inspired you to take up the cello and pursue a career in music?

I always loved the sound of the cello and I found it a very natural instrument to play – unlike the piano which my mother attempted to teach me. Therein lies a lesson: never learn an instrument from your parents!

Who or what have been the most significant influences on your musical life and career?

I wanted to play the cello professionally after I heard the great Russian cellist Rostropovich in concert.

What have been the greatest challenges of your career?

Every performance is a challenge.

You are a passionate advocate of music education? Why do you feel we need proper provision for music education in our schools?

Children deserve a wider education than just a few narrow subjects. They should leave school knowing a lot about the world – and that includes its culture.

As Principal of Royal Birmingham Conservatoire, how do you see this institution’s role in the context of music education in the UK and beyond, and the wider society of the city of Birmingham and the UK in general?

Birmingham is a fantastic city with a great future – soon Londoners will realise that they can have a far better lifestyle for much less cost in Birmingham. Unfortunately that will be the end of the city’s comparatively low property prices. The Royal Conservatoire will be at the heart of the city. We have five performance spaces and we will be running an extensive programme of concerts of every kind of music.

What do you consider to be the most important ideas and concepts to impart to aspiring musicians?

Keep thinking for yourself and never lose your passion for what you do.

As a musician, what is your definition of success?

Bringing music to as many people as possible.
Professor Julian Lloyd Webber is the Principal of Birmingham Conservatoire. Widely regarded as one of the finest musicians of his generation and described by Strad magazine as ‘the doyen of British cellists’, Julian Lloyd Webber has enjoyed one of the most creative and successful careers in classical music today. As founder of the British Government’s In Harmony programme and the Chair of Sistema England, he continues to promote personal and community development in some of England’s most deprived areas. He was elected Fellow of the Royal College of Music in 1994 and – in recognition of his lifelong devotion to the music of Elgar – he was elected President of the Elgar Society in 2009.

At the age of sixteen Julian Lloyd Webber won a scholarship to the Royal College of Music and he completed his studies in Geneva with the renowned cellist, Pierre Fournier. Since then he has collaborated with an extraordinary array of musicians from Lord Yehudi Menuhin, Lorin Maazel and Sir Georg Solti to Elton John and Stephane Grappelli.

Julian Lloyd Webber has premiered more than sixty works for cello and he has inspired new compositions from composers as diverse as Joaquin Rodrigo and Malcolm Arnold to Philip Glass, James MacMillan and – most recently – Eric Whitacre. His many recordings have received worldwide acclaim: his Brit-award winning Elgar Concerto conducted by Lord Menuhin was chosen as the finest ever version by BBC Music Magazine and his coupling of Britten’s Cello Symphony and Walton’s Concerto with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields conducted by Sir Neville Marriner was described by Gramophone magazine as being “beyond any rival”. He has also recorded several highly successful CDs of shorter pieces including Cello Song, Unexpected Songs and – together with Jiaxin Lloyd Webber – A Tale of Two Cellos: “It would be difficult to find better performances of this kind of repertoire anywhere on records of today or yesterday” – Gramophone.

Julian is married to fellow cellist Jiaxin Cheng. He was the London Underground’s first official busker and he was the only classical musician chosen to perform at the Closing Ceremony of Olympics 2012. In April 2014 Julian received the Incorporated Society of Musician’s annual Distinguished Musician Award.

www.julianlloydwebber.com